Life-Changing Chickpea Brine Vegan Pavlova (or meringues) | picklesnhoney.com

Aquafaba Vegan Pavlova (or meringue)

Have you ever been so excited about something, you momentarily lose your words? This may sound silly, but that’s what happened to me with this aquafaba vegan pavlova. Back in 2011 when I first started Pickles & Honey, I discovered a veg-friendly diner in town that made a killer vegan lemon meringue pie. As much as I gush over chocolate, lemon and meringue rank right up there for me too. I have memories of enjoying lemon meringue pie with my grandmother years ago, sitting at her big dining room table with the cream-colored lace tablecloth, and savoring bites of that fluffy, airy topping while she would tell me in detail how to make the various components from scratch, all the while warning me about eating too much sugar.

Life-Changing Aquafaba Vegan Pavlova! (or meringues) | picklesnhoney.com #vegan #pavlova #aquafaba #dessert #recipe

Life-Changing Aquafaba Vegan Pavlova! (or meringues) | picklesnhoney.com #vegan #pavlova #aquafaba #dessert #recipe

Life-Changing Aquafaba Vegan Pavlova! (or meringues) | picklesnhoney.com #vegan #pavlova #aquafaba #dessert #recipe

When I decided to stop consuming animal products, I had given up on making meringue. That vegan lemon meringue pie at the diner made me realize, however, that maybe it was possible to recreate it at home. After a lot of trial and error, I finally figured out how to make mint chocolate chip meringue cookies using the boxed egg replacer. They were very similar to the tubs of meringue cookies I used to buy every week at Trader Joe’s back in college, but I still felt like I could do better. The other week I started hearing about people using aquafaba (aka chickpea brine) to make meringue and pavlova. It sounded really strange and even a little unappetizing, so I dismissed it the first time. But then more and more people kept raving about aquafaba and I figured I’d give it a try too. So I poured the liquid from a can of chickpeas into my stand mixer, set it to high, and anxiously watched to see what would happen.

The result was amazing! That word gets way overused in blogging, where every recipe is “the best ever!“, but this time I promise you it’s true. The liquid, which is maybe half a cup to start, gets so fluffy it nearly fills the entire mixing bowl. And that’s when I knew I had to make the dessert I’ve been dreaming about for years: vegan pavlova.

Life-Changing Aquafaba Vegan Pavlova! (or meringues) | picklesnhoney.com #vegan #pavlova #aquafaba #dessert #recipe

With its light and crunchy meringue, rich, fluffy whipped cream, and layers of bright, juicy fruit to round out the sweetness…this dessert makes me swoon big time. Aquafaba changes everything.

Life-Changing Aquafaba Vegan Pavlova! (or meringues) | picklesnhoney.com #vegan #pavlova #aquafaba #dessert #recipe

This vegan pavlova is indiscernible from the original egg-white version, with its perfectly hollow, crispy, and ever-so-slightly chewy bites. The chickpea brine functions exactly like egg whites, so much so that I was able to translate the other ingredients for classic, non-vegan pavlova almost verbatim. Where there are nuances is in the temperature of the aquafaba and the bake time, and I’ve detailed all of this in the recipe notes so there should be no guesswork on your end. It took me five tries to get the pavlova just right, and then I dropped it (!!!) as I was telling Aaron how we needed to “be careful moving it around for photos.” All was not lost though, because we’re happily eating my mistakes with dollops of leftover coconut whipped cream and lots of berries and figs. It’s been a very excellent week on the dessert front.

Life-Changing Aquafaba Vegan Pavlova! (or meringues) | picklesnhoney.com #vegan #pavlova #aquafaba #dessert #recipe

Life-Changing Aquafaba Vegan Pavlova! (or meringues) | picklesnhoney.com #vegan #pavlova #aquafaba #dessert #recipe

I have a little insider secret for you too. There’s this period at the end of the mixing process when your meringue will take on beautiful, glossy peaks. This will not only make you inexplicably happy, but those peaks also taste exactly like marshmallow fluff! I’ll leave it up to you what you do with that information. My vote, though, is to make yourself an old-school pb & fluff sandwich while you wait for the pavlova to bake. Or maybe some crazy good dark chocolate s’mores. It’d be hard to go wrong whatever you choose.

Life-Changing Aquafaba Vegan Pavlova! (or meringues) | picklesnhoney.com #vegan #pavlova #aquafaba #dessert #recipe

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Aquafaba Vegan Pavlova (or meringue)

Life-Changing Chickpea Brine Vegan Pavlova (or meringues) | picklesnhoney.com

Aquafaba Vegan Pavlova (or meringue)

Gluten Free, Vegan,

Serves: 1 large or 6+ individual pavlovas


Prep Time: 15 mins

Cook Time: 2 hours

Who knew that the liquid from a can of chickpeas (aka aquafaba), the stuff we've been pouring down the drain, was the secret to perfect vegan pavlova? This stuff is an exact match for egg-white based meringue.

Life-Changing Chickpea Brine Vegan Pavlova (or meringues) | picklesnhoney.com

Aquafaba Vegan Pavlova (or meringue)

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Ingredients

For the aquafaba meringue base:

  • liquid from one 15-ounce can of unsalted or low sodium chickpeas, chilled
  • 1 cup vegan fine white sugar
  • 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder
  • pinch fine grain sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar

For the topping:

  • coconut whipped cream
  • 2 1/2 cups sliced berries/fresh fruit

Cuisine: Gluten Free, Vegan Servings: 1 large or 6+ individual pavlovas

Prep Time: 15 mins Cook Time: 2 hours

Who knew that the liquid from a can of chickpeas (aka aquafaba), the stuff we've been pouring down the drain, was the secret to perfect vegan pavlova? This stuff is an exact match for egg-white based meringue.

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 275°F. Trace an 8" circle on a piece of parchment paper (I used a cake pan as a guide). Flip the parchment paper over and line a baking sheet with it. In a small bowl, mix together the sugar, arrowroot powder and salt. Set aside.
  • Pour the chickpea liquid into a large mixing bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer. Beat at low speed, then slowly increase the speed to high. Beat for 5 minutes, until soft peaks have formed and the mixture has become very light and fluffy (it should expand to more than quadruple in size). Turn the speed down to medium-high and start adding the sugar one heaping tablespoon at a time. Once all of the sugar has been added, increase the speed back to the highest setting. Continue to whip until stiff, glossy peaks form and hold their shape (about 3 minutes). You should be able to hold the mixing bowl upside down and have the meringue stay in place. Stop the mixer and pour in the vanilla and vinegar. Beat for another 10-15 seconds until incorporated.
  • Use a spatula or fill a piping bag (fitted with a large star attachment to create lines) and place the meringue onto the prepared baking sheet in the center of the circle working outward. You'll want to do this immediately after whipping the meringue so it doesn't deflate. If using a spatula, spread the meringue to fill the circle. The edges should be higher than the center to make a nest for the filling. To do this, simply pipe an extra round or two around the edges, or if using a spatula, take a spoon and gently create a well in the center. You can smooth out the sides or leave them as-is for a more rustic pavlova.
  • Put the meringue in the oven to bake and immediately turn down the heat to 250°F. Bake for 2-2.5 hours, or until the outside is dry to the touch and ever so slightly browned. The pavlova should sound hollow when very lightly tapped. Turn off the oven, leaving the pavlova inside to cool completely.
  • Just prior to serving, spread the coconut whipped cream over the pavlova and top with your favorite fruit. Serve immediately.

Notes [8]

*Edited to add Based on comments, this seems to be a recipe that can be a bit temperamental. I’ve tested it nearly ten times now, and it’s imperative that you follow the ingredients, amounts for each (don’t reduce the sugar!), and instructions exactly.

The ONLY thing you might try differently is what reader Felicity said in her comment: “I tried your recipe twice. The first time I followed it to the letter. The second time I added the vinegar at the start when I was slowly increasing the speed of the stand mixer to get it too soft peaks. It volumised so much more and much faster too. I looked up why and the acid in the vinegar relaxes the protein strands in the chickpea brine and allows them to trap more air. Thus more volume. I am feeding it to non vegans today. They won’t even be able to tell the difference.”

A few more key notes: when you whip the chickpea liquid for the first time, it should resemble shaving cream in texture, and when you whip in the sugar, the “stiff, glossy peaks” should be very thick and similar to fluffernutter with a definite sheen. If you’re not seeing this, keep whipping! Finally, people seem to have an easier time making smaller pavlovas (6+ instead of 1). The smaller the meringues, the less bake time you’ll need. I suggest 1.5 – 2 hours if you divide the mixture to make 6-8 meringues.*

I tried making this with room temperature chickpea liquid and chickpea liquid that I chilled in the fridge. The chilled liquid is 100% the way to go. It produces a significantly more fluffy meringue that holds its shape much better.

You can make individual meringues or pavlovas. Simply pipe the meringue into smaller circles and reduce the baking time accordingly. I found 1 hour 30 minutes to work well for 6 smaller pavlovas. Just make sure that when you check on them, you use the oven light rather than opening the door. This will keep the temperature from dropping.

This recipe also makes a killer vegan fluff! Skip the baking and enjoy it right away on a peanut butter sandwich, or bake half into pavlova and save the other half to use as fluff. It makes a ton.

Feel free to replace part or all of the vanilla extract for other flavored extracts. I made some with half vanilla and half almond extract and they were insanely good.

I recommend serving your pavlovas with unsweetened or very lightly sweetened coconut whipped cream and some tart or bitter fruit to balance the sweetness of the meringue. I used berries and figs for mine, but I have a feeling kumquats would be amazing.

Copyright © 2019 Amanda Maguire for Pickles & Honey

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  1. Genius! Now to get this sugar free so I can eat it. I need to start experimenting. Thanks for introducing me to this. Strangley enough I had nerve heard of this being done until you posted about it a few days ago on IG and I’ve since seen several other posts. Madness. Love it and love your pictures. Just gorgeous.

    1. Amanda says

      Thank you! I’m so glad I could share the chickpea brine trick with you!

      1. Shonagh Musgrave says

        It is truly amazing that this works. I do think, however, that the name could be improved upon. Having *brine* in the title is quite off-putting to me! Amazing vegan meringues…???

    2. Rosemary Dale says

      I used dextrose powder in place of regular sugar and it worked really well.

  2. r says

    These photos are gorgeous!

    1. Amanda says

      Thanks! We’re happy you like them!

      1. Tara says

        Can I make these the day before?

      2. Yes! Bake the meringues the day before, then assemble the pavlova immediately before serving.

      3. Tara says
  3. Cadry says

    Well done! Your pavlova sounds like a triumph, and these pictures are gorgeous!

    1. Amanda says

      Thank you, Cadry! It does feel like a triumph. It’s the little things, right? Whoever discovered the chickpea brine/egg-white swap is a genius.

      1. cynthia says

        the current popularity is from the facebook group vegan meringue — hits and misses. y’all can join and read all about the various applications there.

      2. marta says

        I happen to know the “genius”… his name is Joël Roessel, he is a french singer, here is his blog http://www.revolutionvegetale.com/en/
        Congratulations your pavlova breaks the screen! 🙂

      3. Amanda says

        Thanks for the link, Marta!

  4. Shana says

    Holy crap this is incredible! I have been waiting for vegan fluff and egg white replacer for SO LONG. I must try this!

    1. Amanda says

      The fluff is awesome! As is the pavlova, of course. 🙂 You have to give it a try–seriously impressive what the humble little chickpea can do!

      1. Shana says

        YAHTZEE! So, I didn’t make the pavlova but I HAD to try whipping the chickpea brine to see if it would really fluff up. I was so excited when it did! I added 1/4 cup of white sugar and 3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract and am using mine as a whipped topping. In fact, I just ate some a la strawberry shortcake. There is no vegan whipped cream to be found in my town and this is a lovely homemade substitute. Thank you so much for sharing this recipe!

      2. Amanda says

        Using the whipped topping on strawberry shortcake is genius! I bet it’s perfect for that.

  5. Richa says

    So Awesome!! looks perfect and gorgeous photos!

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  7. Rosanna says

    Amanda, I can only compare your breakthrough to the invention of light bulbs!!. WoW!. I wonder if I can make it using the water I use to cook my chickpeas. I’m not a “can” buyer since I’d rather buy dry chickpeas and cook at home but I’m willing to give it a try.. Your website by the way looks wonderful.. it did before too but now it’s even better!.. Pictures are stunning as usual!

    1. Amanda says

      That is quite the comparison! Ha! I don’t think you’d be able to use the water from home-cooked chickpeas, unless it’s very concentrated. That chickpea brine from the can is very thick and almost syrupy. I’m with you on opting for making your own (taste, cost, bpa-free), but in this case I’d say it’s worth it to buy a can. The results are amazing!
      We’re so happy you’re liking the new design!

      1. Tulasi-Priya says

        You can definitely make the chickpea brine from scratch. Join the Vegan Meringue – Hits and Misses group on Facebook to find the recipe. It’s in their group files.

  8. Linda says

    This is super exciting! Thanks so much for the post. Do you know if whipping the chickpea brine can be done by hand? And if so, does the recipe have to be modified? I don’t have a stand mixer for now but I do have strong arms 😉

    1. Amanda says

      haha I love your comment about strong arms. I haven’t tried whipping the chickpea brine by hand, but I’ve read that people have had trouble with that. Do you have a set of hand mixers? Those should work in place of a stand mixer.

  9. Yes! I made a chickpea brine pavlova for Easter and it was so delicious, even my very traditional Grandma loved it. Yours looks beautiful! I’m thinking of making another one for a bridal shower I’m hosting this weekend. It’s amazing that this is made from chickpea water!

    1. Amanda says

      That’s so awesome, Christine! I bet it was really rewarding to have your Grandma love the pavlova too. I think it would be the perfect dessert for a bridal shower!

    2. Niketa says

      I tried this recipe and it did not work for me ?! When I put it in the oven everything melted after sometime.. Not sure why? I used exact same ingredients and qty suggested! Can you please tell me if this has happened to you too and what fixed it?
      Thanks in advance!!

      1. Hi Niketa, Sorry you had some trouble with the pavlova! This can be a temperamental recipe, even though the ingredients and process are really simple. A couple of thoughts: 1) make sure the “stiff glossy peaks” are really thick–it should be similar to fluffernutter in texture. If it’s not, keep whipping. 2) you might try this recipe again making smaller pavlovas. Mine turned out really well when I divided the mixture into 6-8 mini meringues, then baked them for about 2 hours. Definitely make sure your oven is a true 275 degrees F when you put them in and then immediately drop it to 250 (you can use an oven thermometer to confirm). Also, don’t open the oven door to check on them. It’s better to use the oven light so the temperature stays consistent. I hope this helps! I’ve tried to detail as much of this as possible in the recipe notes.

  10. Kait says

    Mmmmm….when I was still in my “flirting with dairy” stage, I would totally indulge in pavlova. One of my Aussie friends from grad school would make them in bulk (like 10 at a time) for big celebrations. So. Damn. Good. Now no one needs to suffer! THANK YOU MIGHTY CHICKPEA!

    1. Amanda says

      That is a whole lot of pavlova! I think you’re going to be blown away by the chickpea version. It’s EXACTLY like the original, in my humble opinion. 🙂

  11. LM says

    Genius, and I can’t wait to try it!
    However, “brine” means a salty liquid. If you use that term to describe something that makes meringue, it may put people off.

    1. Amanda says

      Great, hope you love the pavlova! I agree that “chickpea brine” isn’t the most appetizing phrase, but that’s what most people are using so I’m following suit. “Chickpea water” isn’t much better…it’s kind of strange no matter what you call it!

      1. LM says

        I never could have imagined it! It seems like magic.

  12. Draups says

    So I was very excited to try this, it seems insane. I got it to go fluffy and firm and it was all going fine, till I put it in the oven. It started to go brown after 10 mins, so I turned it down a bit but was soft and burnt after half an hour. What did I do wrong? Help.

    1. Amanda says

      Sorry you had some trouble! It sounds like the oven temperature was way too high (my pavlova only started to brown ever so slightly after more than 2 1/2 hours in the oven). Ovens can run hotter/colder, so I would definitely recommend an oven thermometer for yours. Also, did you make sure to pre-heat it to 275 degrees F and then turn it down to 250 as soon as you put the pavlova in to bake? In order for pavlova (vegan or not) to turn out, it needs to be baked at a low temperature for a very long time–the center, as well as the sides, need to dry out completely. It should sound hollow when you lightly tap it.

    2. Amanda says

      One other thought occurred to me: where is your oven rack placed? I baked my pavlovas in the center of the oven.

  13. Leah says

    I tried making this earlier today, and, like Daups, it was going fine until I put the meringue in the oven. I checked on it after about 40 minutes, and the fluffy, 8-inch-across mound had deflated: It had spread out into a thin puddle that filled the entire baking sheet. It was crispier at the outer edges and watery in the center, for what that’s worth.

    I’d followed the instructions about warming the oven to 275 degrees Fahrenheit prior to placing the meringue in the oven, at which point I lowered it to 250 degrees. The rack was in the center of the oven.

    I know it’s me, not your wonderfully detailed instructions. Can you help? I’d like to give it another try.

    Thank you!

    1. Amanda says

      Hi Leah, let’s see if we can troublshoot this. 🙂 My hunch is that maybe the chickpea brine and sugar needs to be whipped for longer, based on my first trial where it spread slightly when I baked it (I haven’t had it come anywhere near filling the baking sheet though…). When you whipped the chickpea brine, did it get fluffy to the point where it looked kind of like shaving cream? I know that sounds weird, but that’s how I would describe it. And then when you slowly added in the sugar and whipped it again, did it form really stiff and glossy peaks? My test for this is being able to flip the bowl upside down and have it not budge. My last question (for now): did you use a stand mixer? I’ve only made this recipe with my kitchenaid mixer, but other bloggers have successfully used hand mixers. However, I’m wondering if the stand mixer is more powerful and hand mixers require more time whipping the meringue to get it super fluffy/stiff.

      1. Leah says

        That was fast – thank you! It got *very* fluffy, yes – just like shaving cream. I’m not sure if the peaks were stiff and glossy – perhaps not – but I did put the mixing bowl to the upside-down test and the meringue held its own. And I did use a stand mixer.

        My uncertainty about whether the peaks were glossy makes me think that probably weren’t glossy enough. I’d know if they were glossy, right? I’ll give it another go and mix for a few minutes more. (I Googled the problem, too, and one website said it was possible to overmix, but I’m not sure how one would know that prior to putting it in the oven.)

        Thanks earnestly for your help. I’ll post again after I’ve tried more mixing.

      2. Amanda says

        The glossiness change happened for me a couple of minutes after mixing in the sugar. It’s a noticeable change–the peaks take on a sheen. I think this might be one of those recipes that takes a couple of tries to get totally down pat. It’s really simple, but the method requires some precision. Definitely report back on how trial #2 goes. I’m sending good baking vibes your way!

      3. Fiona Burtt says

        Oh dear, this is exactly what just happened to me! I followed the instructions to the letter and what I put in the oven was a beautiful looking construction, all firm and ready to bake into a pavlova meringue. But i just checked on it, after an hour, and it had miraculously transformed itself in to a flat puddle. Oh woe! I was so excited…

  14. Natasha Jones says

    I tend to cook my own chickpeas rater than buy then ready cooked… is the brine the same as the water that the chickpeas were cooked in? I really want to try this as it looks so delicious but don’t want to mess it up!

    1. Amanda says

      Hi Natasha! Someone else asked about this too, but I don’t think you’d be able to use the water from home-cooked chickpeas, unless it’s very concentrated. That chickpea brine from the can is thick and almost syrupy.

  15. Amanda says

    Do you need to use the arrowroot? I don’t have any and want to try this. Thanks x

    1. Amanda says

      Yes, the arrowroot acts as a thickener. You can likely use cornstarch or tapioca starch in its place. Let me know how it turns out if you try it!

  16. Stacy says

    I made this over the weekend for a brunch get-together and it was AMAZING! People couldn’t believe it was made from chickpea liquid! I’m already planning to make it again.
    Thanks for the detailed instructions. I know it turned out perfectly because of them.

    1. Amanda says

      I’m so happy you loved the recipe, Stacy!

  17. tara@littlehomekitchen.wordpress says

    This recipe is beautifully detailed and photographed! I’m not a vegan, but I often have to cook vegan food, and I can’t wait to try this. I will be using my own chickpea water, though, so it looks like I may be in for a few trials… Ill let you know how they turn out!

    1. Amanda says

      Thank you, Tara! And yes, please report back on how the pavlova works out!

  18. Kate says

    Tried this for the first time today. Mine too, was fluffy and light and passed the upside down test. But after an hour expanding in the oven, it turned into a puddle in the baking tray. A bit disappointing it was looking really good. Does anyone know why it might do this?

    1. Amanda says

      Hi Kate! So it seems like this can be a temperamental recipe, even though the ingredients and process are really simple. A couple of thoughts: 1) make sure the “stiff glossy peaks” are really thick–it should be similar to fluffernutter in texture. If it’s not, keep whipping. 2) you might try this recipe again making smaller pavlovas. Mine turned out really well when I divided the mixture into 6-8 mini meringues, then baked them for about 2 hours. Definitely make sure your oven is a true 275 degrees F when you put them in and then immediately drop it to 250. Also, don’t open the oven door to check on them. It’s better to use the oven light so the temperature stays consistent. I hope this helps! Let me know if you have questions I can help with.

  19. Shannon says

    I made this yesterday and it worked beautifully! It made a lot too, which was good because everyone kept stealing bites before I could put it in the oven. I made mini meringues like you said (6 of them) and it took around 2 hours to bake if that’s helpful for anyone.

  20. Amanda says

    Wow! This is totally genius. I’ve been vegan for 3 years and meringue is on my bucket list of things to masterfully veganize. It looks like you may have saved me quite a bit of time. 🙂 I can’t wait to try it out!

    1. Amanda says

      I hope you love the meringue!

  21. Laura says

    I’m trying this beaut of a recipe with maple sugar and vanilla-stewed rhubarb today and I literally CANNOT wait to try it 🙂

    1. Amanda says

      Um, vanilla-stewed rhubarb?! That will be INSANE with the pavlova! I like where your head is at with the maple sugar too. 🙂

  22. Marie says

    How amazing. A friend sent this on to me I am looking forward to trying it out. Personally, even before I became vegan, I found pavs too sweet and gooey. but it is a brilliant break through recipe for vegan promotion. I will be making it for family get togethers where there’s always at least one pav on the table. So does anyone know the science behind why it foams to meringue consistency?

  23. Marilyn says

    How long should I let it cool in the oven once I’ve turned it off?

    1. Amanda says

      Hi Marilyn! You should let the pavlova cool in the oven until the oven has cooled completely. A few hours or overnight is fine. 🙂

      1. Marilyn says

        Thanks, Amanda!

        I reallynloved the fluff. I must have enjoyed thr pavlova too because my husband only ate a bit and it’s gone now!

      2. Amanda says

        haha I’ve been there. 😉 I’m so happy you enjoyed the fluff and pavlova!

  24. jelena says

    unbelievably beautiful pictures!!! and of course, i have to try this delicious recipe. stunning. 🙂

    1. Amanda says

      Thank you, Jelena! Please report back if you do try the scones! 🙂

  25. Roamaa says

    Hi Amanda

    The chickpea brine idea is brilliant, but unfortunately until i put the meringue into the oven it melted right away and was all syrupy as its original form. I followed all the instructions, used a hand mixer and it did look like almost glossy peaks had formed and when i turned the bowl upside down it didn’t fall. The rack was in the center of the oven. Please let me know where I went wrong. Oh I do admit the temperature of my oven was slightly on the higher side, maybe 140 degree Fahrenheit.

    Thanks

    1. Amanda says

      Sorry you had some trouble! This can be a temperamental recipe. Did you read all of the “edited to add” instructions in the recipe notes? Those are my best, most clear directions for pavlova success. 🙂 It’s key that the oven temperature be spot-on as well, so if your oven temp was on the higher side, that would have played a big role. Don’t give up!

  26. Preet says

    Can you use normal chickpea water or does it have to be from the can? My mum always soaks chickpeas over night and I was wondering if that water would have the same effect?

    Thanks

    1. Amanda says

      Hi Preet, You can check out my previous responses to others who have asked this question in the comments, but to recap: I know others have had success with using the water after cooking chickpeas at home (not the soaking water, the water they are cooked in), but I haven’t tried this method and can’t vouch for it yet. If you give it a try, report back and let us know!

  27. Felicity says

    Thank you so much for sharing this recipe. I too thought I had to let go of meringue and all the biscuits, cakes and creams that use it as a base when I went vegan. Aqua faba has brought new meaning to my life. I tried your recipe twice. The first time I followed it to the letter. The second time I added the vinegar at the start when I was slowly increasing the speed of the stand mixer to get it too soft peaks. It volumised so much more and much faster too. I looked up why and the acid in the vinegar relaxes the protein strands in the chickpea brine and allows them to trap more air. Thus more volume. I am feeding it to non vegans today. They won’t even be able to tell the difference. Love your website!

    1. GREAT tip about adding the vinegar at the start, Felicity! I hadn’t tried it that way, but I’m definitely doing that next time. Your comment is going to be helpful to a lot of people.

      Aqua faba really is amazing. I had this moment of glee when I first made it and watched it get fluffy, and the finished meringue is so spot-on. Chickpeas are amazing. <3

  28. Donna Hobbs says

    I used a Thermomix with the “butterfly” attachment for anyone who has one. It turned out so well in about 4 minutes (which shocked me!). I made something similar to this but didn’t bake it, this was a few days ago before finding your beautiful website and recipe. I used Xylitol sugar and some xanthan gum and just made fluff. When using your recipe does the arrowroot flour act similarly to xanthan gum? My daughter has a severe egg allergy. The kids loved it! I want to try your recipe and see if I can bake it. Will it be more like meringue than pavlova or does that depend on whipping, oven temperature and time? Your photos are so beautifully presented and look super yummy!! Thank you!

    1. Hi Donna! Thanks for your comment and kind words about our recipe photos. I’ve only ever made the meringues and pavlova as I wrote the recipe ingredients and instructions, so I can’t say how any modifications will work out. What I can say, though, is that it’s a simple but temperamental recipe. I recommend that folks follow the instructions exactly for the best outcome, though that’s not to say it’s the only way to make an awesome vegan pavlova (it’s just the only way I know!). The instructions and notes are super detailed and I’m constantly editing them to be more specific, so hopefully you’ll find them helpful, whatever you decide to do. 🙂

  29. Katie says

    Thank you for this recipe! Would you use standard granulated sugar, or something finer, like caster sugar?

    1. Hey Katie! Finer sugar will work better for this recipe.

  30. Monique says

    My pavlova also liquefied when put into the oven, however I successfully rewhipped the liquid and it formed MUCH nicer glossy peaks. It still didn’t work out right, but I thought I’d pass on that you can rewhip it. (which makes me wonder if you could heat the original brine with sugar/vanilla in it)

  31. Tracey Bourke says

    This is unbelievable. I am not vegan, but was intrigued by the idea of using the brine from chickpeas as an egg substitute

    Thank you – total delicious success!
    .

    1. That’s so awesome you had success with the chickpea brine!! It’s pretty life-changing stuff. 😉

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  33. Anna says

    I just finished making this, and it didn’t hold its shape at all in the oven, it just spread out! I’m not sure what I did wrong… Everything looked perfect when I put it into the oven. I’ve made pavlova with egg whites before and they always turned out well… What happened? How do I make it turn out better next time?

    1. Hi Anna. I’m sorry you had some trouble with the pavlova! Have you read through my recipe notes (below the recipe)? This one can be temperamental despite being simple in terms of ingredients. I’ve put together a really thorough list of notes to help combat this. It sounds like your oven may run hot based on what you said about it spreading out. Do you happen to own an oven thermometer to check? If not, you might try decreasing your oven temp to the lowest setting. Give the recipe notes a read and let me know if you have questions about anything. I’d love for you to perfect this pavlova. It really is wonderful once you nail it. 🙂

  34. Amy says

    Can’t wait to try these! Any idea how long you could store them in an air tight container? Would they lose their crunch?

    1. Hi Amy! I stored my meringues (without the toppings) in an airtight container in the fridge for about 5 days and they stayed crunchy. 🙂

      1. Amy says
      2. Amy says

        Made them for Christmas and they were a huge hit! Everyone agreed they tasted just like normal meringues and couldn’t believe what they were made of. I got loads of nests out of one 15 ounce can (18 nests of about 3.5 inches in diameter). Served some topped with fresh berries and others with sour cherries which balanced out the sweetness perfectly. I waited until just before serving to add the cream and fruit which was good as they did start to dissolve pretty quickly. Thanks for the great recipe, will be making them again this week!

      3. Amy says

        Oh and I added the vinegar at the beginning as suggested in the notes. The mixture fluffed up so quickly!

      4. Woo hoo! I’s so happy you had aquafaba meringue success, Amy! It’s the BEST feeling turning chickpea liquid into fluffy meringues. Your idea to serve them with sour cherries is perfect! I need to try that. <3

  35. rose says

    Hi thank you for this wonderful recipe! My mom makes home made doenjang – think japanese miso but korean. The cooked water from the soybeans are very concentrated & syrupy! I was wondering how much aquafaba you used for this recipe!

    1. Hi Rose, I used the liquid from one 15 ounce can of chickpeas.

  36. Luciana Christiansen says

    Hi Amanda, I love your blog, and I’m really excited to try this recipe. But I really have a problem when baking the merengue. It looks just perfect but in the oven it burns in 15 minutes, so baking It more than one hour just looks crazy but I see the same time for baking in different blogs and recipes. What am I doing wrong? Best regards, Luciana.

    1. Hi Luciana, Sorry you’re having trouble with baking the meringue! It sounds like your oven may be running hot. Do you have an oven thermometer to confirm that it’s baking at the right temperature? If not, I would start there. The oven thermometer will give you a much more accurate reading. Hope this helps!

  37. Sarah says

    I am wanting to make this for a Mother’s Day Lunch for church. How long does this last? Can I make it a couple days ahead? Without the cream of course.

    1. Hi Sarah! Yes, you can make the meringues in advance (store them in an airtight container in the fridge) and then assemble them with the cream and fruit just before serving. Make sure to read through all of the recipe notes because while simple, the aquafaba can be a little temperamental. 🙂

  38. Jennifer says

    Can you freese these? will they taste the same?

    1. Hi Jennifer! I haven’t tried freezing these, but a quick Google search tells me you can freeze regular meringues in an airtight container between sheets of parchment paper for up to 6 months. I don’t see why that wouldn’t work for these.

  39. Jennifer says

    What temp and time adjustments do I need to make if I am splitting into 3 smaller pavloval layers (like in your picture) ? Do you do this recipe 3 times, or did you split into the 3 layers to bake? Becuase when I split into 3, it deflates and burns within 45 min.

    1. You can make individual meringues or pavlovas. Simply pipe the meringue into smaller circles and reduce the baking time accordingly. I found 1 hour 30 minutes to work well for 6 smaller pavlovas. Just make sure that when you check on them, you use the oven light rather than opening the door. This will keep the temperature from dropping.

  40. richelle elek says

    I was able to whip the glossy peaks from the aquafaba but it all turned to liquid in the oven. I suspect my oven was not hot enough. Another recipe recommends pre-heating to 180 degrees Celsius then turning down to 140 degrees as soon as you put the pavlova in. I might try this next time.

  41. Eddie says

    For those asking about using homemade brine, I’ve successfully made this recipe 3 times now by cooking my chickpeas in the crock pot overnight, then cooling everything in the fridge. Once cooled, strain the brine. It will be thick and syrupy, like from the can.
    (I place about an inch of beans in the crock pot, then cover with 2-3 inches of water).
    Hope this helps!

    1. Thank you, Eddie! Your comment is really helpful!

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